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Wildlife Photographer Of The Year

October 24, 2014 in Featured
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Wildlife Photographer Of The Year

 

Winner Michael Nick Nichols!

Lions MM7947

A pride of lions in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park Wildlife Photographer of the Year is co-owned by the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide Michael Nichols Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

Michael Nichol’s extraordinary, almost biblical picture of a pride of lions relaxing in the Serengeti National Park makes him the winner of the world’s most prestigious photographic competition – Wildlife Life Photographer of the Year, now in its 50th year.

A Magnificent Pride

Nick set out to create an archetypal image that would express both the essence of lions and how we visualize them – a picture of a time past, before lions were under such threat. Here, the five females of the Vumbi pride – a ‘formidable and spectacularly cooperative team’ – lie at rest with their cubs on a kopje (a rocky outcrop), in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. Shortly before he took the shot, they had attacked and driven off one of the two pride males. Now they were lying close together, calmly sleeping. They were used to Nick’s presence – he’d been following them for nearly six months – which meant he could position his vehicle close to the kopje.

A Biblical Scene

Making use of a specially made hole in the roof, he slowly stood up to frame the vista, with the Serengeti plains beyond and the dramatic late-afternoon sky above. He photographed them in infrared, which he says, ‘cuts through the dust and haze, transforms the light and turns the moment into something primal, biblical almost’. The chosen picture – and Nick believes that the creation of a picture is as much in the choice as the taking – speaks about lions in Africa, part flashback, part fantasy. Nick got to know and love the Vumbi pride. A few months later, he heard that it had ventured into land beyond the park and that three females had been killed.

 

Young Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Winner!

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is co-owned by the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide Carlos Navas Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is co-owned by the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide Carlos Naval Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

 

Aware of Carlos’s presence, the common yellow scorpion is flourishing its sting as a warning. Carlos had found it basking on a flat stone in a rocky area near his home in Torralba de los Sisones, northeast Spain – also a place that he goes to look for reptiles. The late afternoon sun was casting such a lovely glow over the scene that Carlos decided to experiment with a double exposure (his first ever) so he could include the sun. He started with the background, using a fast speed so as not to overexpose the sun, and then shot the scorpion, using a low flash. But he had to change lenses (he used his zoom for the sun), which is when the scorpion noticed the movement and raised its tail. Carlos then had to wait for it to settle before taking his close-up, with the last rays of the sun lighting up its body.

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibition 2014 is now open to the public – To book tickets go to  – https://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit-us/whats-on/tickets/ 

 

 

 

 

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about the author

Alison Jane Reid

Alison Jane Reid - Journalist, Editor & Emerald Princess of Slow, Sustainable Luxury Living - 18 year track record interviewing real icons for: The Times, The Lady, You, The Mirror and Country Life. Now leading her alluring fairtrade, emerald revolution - Don’t Miss Out - Have you joined The Ethical Hedonist set?



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