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Mon Cherie Amour : (Thrift, Part II)

July 6, 2010 in Archive
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Go foraging for wild cherries they are now in season – you will find them in city parks and the glorious British countryside. But don’t delay, the season is all too brief. If you are not sure where to look – take a tip from His Majesty and study the ground for the bright crimson, juicy stains left by the birds who got there first. Look up, and you will almost certainly be standing underneath a wild cherry tree.  Pile into a beautiful bowl or glass, serve with organic Greek yoghurt or cream and share with someone you love. They taste a thousand times better than the shop bought variety.

Tip –  Look out for the deepest red to black cherries, as you pick they they will come away in your fingers and stain your hands, these are ripe and ready to eat or turn into a favourite recipe.

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Alison Jane Reid

Alison Jane Reid - Journalist, Editor & Emerald Princess of Slow, Sustainable Luxury Living - 18 year track record interviewing real icons for: The Times, The Lady, You, The Mirror and Country Life. Now leading her alluring fairtrade, emerald revolution - Don’t Miss Out - Have you joined The Ethical Hedonist set?



One response to “Mon Cherie Amour : (Thrift, Part II)”

  1. "His Majesty" says:

    Not all wild cherries are sweet : Fruit of the wild cherry tend to be the largest and juiciest, and are either sweet or sour; those of the dwarf cherry always sour; those of the bird cherry, with small, bullet-like fruits, alway bitter.
    So, now you know why wild cherries have traditionally been made into jams or pies with added sugar; or cherry brandy (with or without sugar) where prolonged steeping of the fruits brings out the almond flavour of the stone. You may think that cherry brandy is not very English but perhaps it is no coincidence that cherries flourish in the coastal smuggling counties of Kent and East Sussex, where brandy was widely available in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
    Here endeth the lesson for today : I’m off to forage wild apple mint for a home-made Pimms to enjoy this evening. Any extra will become water ice.

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